Additive manufacturing in the value chain: 3D printing explores new applications

3D printing technologies have recently gained increasing attention from traditional manufacturers such as GE, which recently acquired Morris Technologies (see the January 2, 2013 LRMJ), to consumer-facing on-demand production services such as Shapeways (see the June 18, 2012 LRMJ) and Staples (see t...

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