Clearing away the haze from new EPA emission regulations

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was applauded by environmentalists and chided by industry when it announced on December 16, 2011 the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), a new federal regulation limiting emissions of mercury, arsenic, and metals from power plants. Two weeks later, indu...

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