NEWS COMMENTARY

Ping An Good Doctor unveils an AI-powered unstaffed clinic

Published:
December 03, 2018
Coverage:
Digital Transformation More...
Activities:
Product
by Nardev Ramanathan
Very important

It's no secret that China faces a shortage of doctors. China has 1.8 doctors for every 1,000 people, compared to 2.5 per 1,000 in the U.S. Companies like Ping An have been looking at opportunities in this area, turning to digital health and artificial intelligence to fill the gap. Ping An Good Doctor, a one-stop healthcare ecosystem platform, showcased a tiny unmanned clinic that employs AI. Patients can sit in a 3 m² clinic booth and chat with a cloud doctor, called AI Doctor, about their symptoms. The system would also include a smart medicine cabinet that could dispense more than 100 medications. Clients looking to develop and deploy unmanned healthcare platforms should consider engaging for partnership opportunities.

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