NEWS COMMENTARY

Magnetic superlens enables higher-resolution MRI

Published:
July 8, 2019
Coverage:
Accelerating Materials Innovation More...
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Research
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by Anthony Vicari
Average importance

Boston University researchers developed a metamaterial "magnetic superlens," a precise array of wound copper wire coils that can tightly focus magnetic fields to produce higher-quality images (four times higher signal-to-noise ratio) with a 14 times faster scan rate using existing MRI equipment. This approach could also enable the design of MRI systems with lower-power magnets, reducing operating costs. This research highlights how even highly impactful metamaterial designs can be made with extremely simple, low-cost materials, in this case copper and plastic.

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