NEWS COMMENTARY

VW Group goes all in with $2.6 billion on Ford's autonomous vehicle partner Argo AI

Published:
July 12, 2019
Coverage:
Digital Transformation More...
Activities:
Partnership
by Lewie Roberts
Truly disruptive

Volkswagen (VW) will invest $1 billion in cash towards purchasing equity in Argo (Ford and VW will have equal stakes), and VW's own Autonomous Intelligent Driving (AID) company (valued at $1.6 billion) will be contributed entirely to Argo, with 200 AID employees joining Argo. This new alliance is hugely important to combat similar partnerships in the autonomous vehicle (AV) world, like Cruise and Honda/GM. At the same time, clients should recognize that these types of strong partnerships threaten players broadly looking to develop AVs on their own, like Zoox and Tesla, though many startups are still able to focus on specific commercial applications of AVs.

For the original news article, click here .


Further Reading

Autonomous vehicle developer Navya pivots hard

News Commentary | July 30, 2019

Earlier this month, one of Navya's autonomous shuttles collided with a pedestrian during testing, though reports suggested pedestrian inattentiveness as the cause. Following this news, Navya announced a major change to its business strategy. Instead of providing AVs, the company plans to supply its ... Not part of subscription

Daimler and BMW join forces to tackle shared mobility, providing a blueprint for others to follow

Case Study | May 06, 2019

Automakers spent the past century focused on the same goals: sell more cars and spend less money making them. However, the emergence of shared mobility business models has upended how some consumers think about mobility, with an increasingly large number viewing mobility as a service you can consume... Not part of subscription

Under its new CEO, Ford is entering new mobility-as-a-service markets and bolstering partnerships to help it expand

Case Study | November 28, 2018

In mid‑2017, Ford replaced its CEO. The symbolic ouster of its previous CEO, Mark Fields, in favor of James Hackett, who has led the automaker's self‑driving car work, signaled the company's new focus on emerging mobility‑as‑a‑service markets and supporting technologies. That change had some more ... Not part of subscription