NEWS COMMENTARY

Witteveen+Bos starts operating a large-format gantry-based concrete 3D printer in Singapore

Published:
September 18, 2019
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by Tugce Uslu
Very important

Witteveen+Bos, a Dutch engineering firm, was previously involved in a bicycle bridge 3D printing project in the Netherlands. Recently, the company announced that it started 3D printing operations in Singapore through the Housing and Development Board (HDB). While most of the increasingly more concrete 3D printing technology developers emerge from Europe and the U.S., geographies with government initiatives for the use prefabricated or 3D-printed building components are becoming sweet spots for these companies. Dubai and Singapore are among these geographies, and early-stage building projects in these locations will help accelerate adoption of concrete 3D printing globally.

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