NEWS COMMENTARY

USDA's new partnership with Microsoft leads to business opportunities for IoT sensors in digital agriculture market

Published:
October 10, 2019
Coverage:
Emerging Ecosystems in Agrifood and Health More...
Activities:
Partnership More...
by Lisheng Gao
Very important

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Agriculture Research Services announced its partnership with Microsoft to build machine learning models from disparate farm data. The USDA will pilot Microsoft FarmBeats at its 7,000-acre Beltsville, Maryland, farm and aims for broad future adoption. By combining real-time monitoring of soil temperature, humidity, and acidity with data from weather stations, FarmBeats builds models that optimize crop production and sustainability. Clients, this partnership places Microsoft's platform on a pathway to success. It brings big data and expertise to the platform to enable the spread of digital agriculture, opening new business opportunities for IoT sensors and associated technologies.

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Further Reading

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