NEWS COMMENTARY

Beyond Meat's pea protein supply partnership with Roquette underscores the growth of second-generation proteins

Published:
January 21, 2020
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As a part of this three-year deal, the French ingredient provider will supply pea protein to Beyond Meat as the latter looks to expand and strengthen its presence in other geographies. In 2018, Roquette partnered with Israeli startup Equinom to develop non-GMO legumes with higher protein content using high-speed breeding methods. While the exact details of this supply partnership with Beyond Meat are not disclosed, watch closely to see whether Roquette's new-generation pea protein ingredients with increased protein content will be used in Beyond Meat's patties in the near future. If so, this will give Beyond Meat an edge from a nutritional standpoint in a crowded space of plant-based meat analogs.

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