NEWS COMMENTARY

Didi and AutoX look to begin Shanghai robotaxi pilots by late May

Published:
April 23, 2020
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Operations will be restricted to a 65 km2 operating zone in the Jiading district, and backup drivers will be required to be on board in order to take over as needed. The public pilots will be the first for the country's biggest city, though Didi and AutoX are simply looking to keep up with Pony.ai and Baidu, which already operate passenger transport pilots in Guangzhou and Changsha. While Shanghai pilots have been expected ever since officials issued operating licenses at the end of last year, what is notable in this case is the timing, considering the halt on industrywide operations due to COVID-19. While China has slowly begun to loosen government-mandated restrictions, Lux is skeptical that these pilots will begin in the next month.

For the original news article, click here .


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