NEWS COMMENTARY

Unilever's partnership with Algenuity upholds algae as an opportunity for the food industry

Published:
August 03, 2020
Coverage:
Emerging Ecosystems in Agrifood and Health More...
Activities:
Partnership
Very important

The economic viability of algae production is questionable for most products due to high production costs. Nevertheless, algae is suddenly attracting interest as a protein ingredient from major food companies – first with Nestlé and Corbion and now with Unilever's new partnership with Algenuity. The key differentiating factor for both of these algae developers is the use of scalable photobioreactor technology rather than open-pond systems. Above all, Algenuity claims differentiation in selective trait development of its strain to improve its algae powder's taste, smell, and nutritional content. Clients, when it comes to algae, only engage with developers that can succeed in producing high-value products worth the cost of production.

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Further Reading

Zivo Bioscience

Company Snapshot | April 07, 2020

Zivo Bioscience was acquired by Howard Baer in 2003. To date, the company has raised approximately $110.68 million in total funding. The company produces algal biomass and bioactive compounds to be used as ingredients in food, supplements, and possibly medicine; the company's proprietary algal ... To read more, click here.

Mushlabs

Company Snapshot | August 04, 2020

The company was founded by Vivien Pillet and Mazen Risk (CEO); Mazen has a background in synthetic biology and microbiology; Mushlabs emerged out of stealth mode in 2019. The company has raised an undisclosed amount of funding from a seed round in 2019. Among its investors, we emphasize Atlantic ... Not part of subscription

Cargill establishes joint venture with startup Bflike for its vegan fat and "blood"

News Commentary | April 29, 2021

Bflike will license its technology for use in plant‑based meat and fish alternatives. Details are scarce on what exactly comprises Bflike's technology, but its vegan "blood" is reminiscent of Impossible Foods' fermentation‑derived heme. As Cargill builds out a plant protein business, it is ... To read more, click here.