NEWS COMMENTARY

IBM publishes its quantum roadmap for 2023

Published:
September 15, 2020
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by Lewie Roberts
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Notably, IBM has two processors in development: a 127-qubit processor (slated for 2021) and a 433-qubit processor (slated for 2022). By 2023, it expects to make the jump to an 1,121-qubit processor, though it isn't in development yet. Novel packaging and controls in the 2021 model, followed by component miniaturization in 2022, are key parts of IBM's strategy to scale its qubit count at a rate of more than 2× every year. While clients shouldn't take this roadmap as gospel for the advancement of quantum computers, it is useful to compare the confidence of the industry to the actual development cycles of the coming years.

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